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You know those jobs.....

by ColinR » 12 Jul 2018, 12:00

Just don't set fire to the dust sheets :roll:

Maybe damp them down before starting work.
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by betty boop » 12 Jul 2018, 12:11

I'd try lock picking Ian, may sound a bit 'dodgy' but depends on the lock. there are loads of how to's on U tube I thought? assuming its a cheap lock - but I doubt it, even if its shiney and with a brand name it doesn't mean its not 'cheap' or basic inside -

if theres a key of the same groove to marry up - insert and remove (but not fully ) key quite/very fast whilst keeping a slight opening pressure on the barrel. the tightness of the turning action holds to pins in place as they lock into the open position. the in and out confuses the pins into the go up/down positions to where they should be even if only gradual, each pin will hold until all 6 or so locate. Without a key you can try the same action with a L shaped lever ( a hammered flat bicycle spoke bent to an L works as long as it fits in the barrel) to get technical - an electric tooth brush has the perfect oscillating action for the pin locater. resin fix a wire shaft to the tooth brush end - file to a point/to be thin enough to insert. turn on and insert/almost remove as before whilst applying opening pressure from the lever - eventually you'll open the lock if there are multiple pins etc. Something smaller and easier but strong enough would work if you can push in and put quick enough - like a hair pin (but ask Laura first ;) )

Alternatively a pick kit on ebay will cost a few £ and give you hours of enjoyment. posh locks like the round keys have other opening characteristics which are easy to punch or insert a driver and twist open. the above works with yale locks but they do have bypasses to stop the average thief trying a DIY trick to open your front door but the theory is the same.

Another alternative is look for the serial number and call / visit a lock smith/shop for the master key or duplicate - works with most furniture and low security locks - i.e. YB12 on the barrel denotes the key type and cut.

My understanding is the hardened / tempered side of the lock is the grooved side which holds the lock shut, when cutting - cut the other side as its weaker and possibly not hardened so less effort to force or cut.

alternatively - I'm talking B'ks and you'll find an easier way. :lol: TBH though the above has worked if you try hard enough - I speak from experience. ;) :o
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by Ianfs » 12 Jul 2018, 16:11

Just don't set fire to the dust sheets
Maybe damp them down before starting work.


Arrr, good point. too late. :roll: Luckily they didn't catch fire, but oops. :?

Another alternative is look for the serial number and call /


Err, why would you put the serial number of a padlock on the padlock, surely the point is to make it hard to steal something? :roll:

My understanding is the hardened / tempered side of the lock is the grooved side which holds the lock shut, when cutting - cut the other side as its weaker


Are now that's maybe why it only took about a minute and a half to go through the padlock arm. I was expecting to spend at least 20mins and several discs cutting through. But a .75mm disc at 30,000rpm seem to eat it.
I am beginning to think there is more to you than meets the eye Ian, did you have another life in the SAS or perhaps MI6 or something like that? :D :ugeek:

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by betty boop » 13 Jul 2018, 09:28

Ianfs wrote:
Just don't set fire to the dust sheets
Maybe damp them down before starting work.


Arrr, good point. too late. :roll: Luckily they didn't catch fire, but oops. :?

Another alternative is look for the serial number and call /


Err, why would you put the serial number of a padlock on the padlock, surely the point is to make it hard to steal something? :roll: -

For idiots like me who loose the keys and need a cheap replacement - LOL in my defence Ive seen it a few times on a few different locks but mainly LOW LOW security ones.

My understanding is the hardened / tempered side of the lock is the grooved side which holds the lock shut, when cutting - cut the other side as its weaker


Are now that's maybe why it only took about a minute and a half to go through the padlock arm. I was expecting to spend at least 20mins and several discs cutting through. But a .75mm disc at 30,000rpm seem to eat it.
I am beginning to think there is more to you than meets the eye Ian, did you have another life in the SAS or perhaps MI6 or something like that? :D :ugeek:

Now I could tell you but I'd have to silence you afterwards :ugeek: . but you have it almost right. I've read the books on technique from certain ex members but I've also had a fascination of lock picking from loosing my keys at school and needing to pick lockers to get back in. That and a few thin coat hangers down ford escort window frames - :lol: :lol: but all legit I promise. :D


]
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by Ianfs » 13 Jul 2018, 17:51

It is a bit of a worry that the Dremel went through the shaft as if it were butter. :shock:
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